By PC Geeks Support / Blog / / 0 Comments

How to Fix A Bluescreen On Your PC

If you have been a computer user for any significant length of time then it’s fairly likely that you have experienced the dreaded bluescreen of death. This problem is amongst the most annoying issues found on the computer and the steps to fixing or overcoming it aren’t always obvious as they can be happening for any number of different reasons which can all potentially have different solutions.

How to Fix A Bluescreen On Your PC

These solutions can range from something as simple as installing system updates to being so extreme that they require a factory reset of your system. However, most of the causes for a bluescreen fall somewhere in-between these two extremes. That may sound bad but if you attempt these solutions then you will likely succeed in overcoming your bluescreen problem.

#1: Install Updates

While this is unlikely to solve a bluescreen, installing updates to your computer can result in the bluescreen being fixed as they are sometimes caused by problems with your OS. However, this is rare and you should not expect a simple installation of updates to fix your problem.

#2: Install the latest Drivers

A blue screen can be caused by hardware and software incompatibilities so one of the possible solutions for a bluescreen is to make sure you have the most recent versions of your device drivers installed in case an incompatibility issue with drivers is causing your bluescreen problem.

#5: Roll Back to a prior Restore Point

The final possible solution requires that you have access to restore points. A blue screen issue could potentially have been introduced between restore points so if you roll your system back far enough then it should remove the problem. But this does require that you have made a point to use the system restore point feature. If you have decided to not create restore points then the only alternative to this is to literally reset your computer to its factory settings.

For more ways to resolve your bluescreen problem, contact PC Geeks today for more tips and suggestions on potential solutions.

By PC Geeks Support / Blog / / 0 Comments

Random Access Memory (or RAM for short) is one of the most important parts of your computer. RAM is the extremely fast memory that is used by your computer to temporarily store data, but how can you tell if you need more of it? Most operating systems today require a minimum of around 2 gigabytes (or GB for short), but unless you perform very light tasks you will often need at least 6GB or even more, with most computers on the market today using around 8GB. With RAM, the more memory you have, the better!

Troubleshooting: How To Tell if You Need More RAM

First, you should know how much RAM your machine currently has installed. There are a few ways you can do this, but in Windows the easiest way is by right clicking My Computer and selecting Properties. Here, you can see (in gigabytes) the amount of RAM you currently have installed. You can also find more information on your memory specifications by accessing the Task Manager from the CTRL+ALT+DEL menu and checking the Performance tab. From the Performance tab, click the graph box for “Memory,” and you can view a number of details about the specifications of your currently installed RAM, including the frequency, type (generally DDR3 or DDR4), and form factor of your RAM (DIMM for desktops or SODIMM for laptops).

There are some easy ways to tell during use whether or not you need to upgrade your memory. The most common symptoms are if your computer performance is very slow or unstable, particularly when attempting to access files or programs. Sometimes, when you do not have enough memory, programs become inconsistent and may crash, and videos or video games may “stutter” and play sluggishly. Programs, directories, and internet browsers can take a very long time to load if you are low on memory, especially if you already have multiple programs or browsing windows open to begin with. Furthermore, some internet browsers like Google Chrome and Microsoft Edge can be very memory intensive, sometimes even using 4GB alone or more with numerous tabs open!

To help determine for certain that the issue is RAM and not another hardware or software problem that needs to be addressed, you can check the Task Manager to view some important statistics. In the Task Manager, you can view the programs and processes currently running on your computer. The Task Manager will show you how much each program is using the various resources, with the percentage of how much of each resource is utilized at the top. These resources include CPU usage, network bandwidth, disk usage, GPU usage, and memory. If the total percentage of memory currently used is 80% or higher, it is probably time to upgrade your memory!

Do you need more help troubleshooting your computer problems, or recommendations for upgrades? Do you want your upgrades professionally installed by our qualified technicians? Contact us today at one of our locations!

By PC Geeks Support / Blog / / 0 Comments

In just a little less than nine months, Windows 7 will finally reach end-of-life status. The sad reality is that the OS will no longer be supported unless users are willing to cough up some cash to upgrade to Windows 10. As a result, if you’re running the OS, chances are good that new hardware will not have the support it needs.

Windows 7 Will Soon Include Microsoft's 'Nag' Screens

A (Not So) Gentle Reminder

For those old enough to remember, when Windows XP was nearing its final run, Microsoft implemented a popup screen that would let the user know they needed to upgrade their OS. This ‘nag’ screen would provide users with the opportunity to upgrade or learn more about what to expect when the operating system reaches end-of-life.

Unsurprisingly, Microsoft plans on implementing these little bundles of joy to encourage users to upgrade to Windows 10 starting in April. When users start to see these prompts, Microsoft at least gives them the option to silence them. Users will see a “do not notify me again” setting. Of course, with nearly a third of all Windows PCs still running Windows 7, it’s not likely that every user will upgrade before Microsoft stops supporting it.

Additional Impact

While those using a single PC version can expect to see ‘nag’ screens, what isn’t known is whether commercial businesses will see them. It’s hard to imagine a scenario in which Microsoft doesn’t give admins the ability to turn the notifications off for end users, but the software giant has yet to define how this situation will be handled.

Additionally, Office 2010 will no longer receive support at the end of 2019. As both Windows 7 and Office 10 reach their respective ends-of-life, it might make sense for you to start migrating to newer versions. If so, take a moment to reach out to PC Geeks, who can help you along the way.

By PC Geeks Support / Blog / / 0 Comments

Processor Upgrades: A Short Guide

Has your computer been performing poorly lately? Is it slow and unmanageable, to the point where it is sometimes practically unusable? Or, perhaps, is it too slow to run some of the programs you would like to use, like editing software and video games? If so, it might be time for a new Central Processing Unit- “CPU” or “processor” for short. A common allusion is that the CPU is the “brain” of the computer, because it is where the main calculations are performed. The motherboard is the central part of the computer and is designed to be compatible with a specific CPU brand and type through the use of a compatible “socket.”

Processor Upgrades: A Short Guide

There are three major aspects that you should consider before you can upgrade your computer’s processor. The first aspect is what CPU type is supported by your motherboard, the second is what you will be using the computer for, and the third is what your budget for the upgrade will be. What type of CPU you can select depends upon these three major factors!     Firstly, you must consider what your computer supports: this depends on the socket type of your motherboard, which is the specific type of interface between the processor and the rest of the computer. The two major PC CPU manufacturers are Intel and AMD, and these manufacturers use separate standards for CPU sockets. For example, if you are planning on getting an AMD Ryzen 5 2600X CPU, you would require a motherboard compatible with the Ryzen CPUs, which would mean one using the AM4 socket. On the other hand, if you were planning on using an Intel i7-8700, you would need a motherboard using the LGA1151 socket.

Second, you need to consider what the machine you are upgrading or building will be used for. For example, if the machine is going to be used for something relatively light, such as internet browsing, you could get by with a lower end, more inexpensive CPU, like an Intel i3 or an AMD Ryzen 3. However, if you are planning on using the computer for more demanding tasks like gaming or photo and video editing, you will need a more powerful, higher end CPU, such as an Intel i5 or higher or an AMD Ryzen 5 or higher.

Finally, you will need to consider what your budget is for the parts you need to replace. Lower end CPUs like the Intel i3 or AMD Ryzen 3 are typically around $150 or below, while higher end CPUs like the Intel i5 and i7 series or AMD Ryzen 5 and 7 series are usually upwards of $180. It is also important to note that these prices do not account for fluctuations in costs or the cost of a motherboard. Generally the CPU will be more expensive than the motherboard, but it is still a good idea to get the best motherboard option you can afford, as better motherboards are more effective, more reliable, and include more features. Furthermore, a CPU replacement and upgrade is relatively simple, but having to replace or upgrade a motherboard is more complicated and can require significantly more work!

Need Help?

Selecting upgrades for your computer can often be confusing and stressful, but we are here to help! Do you want advice on selecting a processor, or do you want your new upgrades installed professionally by our qualified technicians? Contact us at one of our locations!

By PC Geeks Support / Blog / / 0 Comments

Laptops are convenient gadgets. You can take them anywhere for work or personal use. However, even your most reliable laptop experiences problems occasionally, and laptop repair might be necessary. You don’t want to ignore the problems or attempt to fix them yourself if you’re not skilled at doing so. This leads to permanent damage to your laptop. Instead, you should bring your laptop to a trained professional. Here is how you can detect issues with your laptop.

How to Detect Problems With Your Laptop

Constant Error Messages 

If your laptop receives a lot of error messages, then something is wrong. The causes of these errors could be a virus or a hardware issue. You might notice that certain error messages have different titles or names, and it confuses you. If you struggle with figuring out what the error messages mean even after researching the problems, bring the laptop to a trained repair specialist.

Weird Sounds 

If your laptop gives off weird noises while you use it, this could be a sign of trouble. When these sounds appear more frequent, it’s time to take notice. You should save all of your files to a cloud service or external hard drive in the event your computer crashes after you start hearing these sounds. Hardware failure is one of the main culprits of the weird noises so it’s a good idea to do a systems diagnostic test of your laptop. If nothing changed after this, you want to visit a technician.

Blue Screen 

When you see the blue screen on your laptop, this means trouble. Aging hardware or overheating could be the causes of blue screens. If your laptop is unusually hot when in use or if the laptop’s fans give off loud sounds, then overheating has occurred. Blue screens also happen due to malware or other viruses. Conduct a thorough scan of your laptop to see if this is the case. If you took these steps but you still see a blue screen, take it to a professional.

Missing Files 

This is another sign that something could be wrong with your laptop. Malware is one cause of this, but it could also be due to corrupted files. You risk corruption of your files if you shut down your laptop from the power button instead of the “shut down” feature on your computer’s menu. Poorly-functioning sectors within a hard disk could also cause file corruption.

In conclusion, there are times when your laptop experiences problems. This is part of the normal wear and tear of gadgets in general. But with troubleshooting and help from a technician, your laptop will act right again.

If your laptop is in need of repairs, contact us.  We have friendly and experienced staff waiting to help your laptop operate better.

By PC Geeks Support / Blog / / 0 Comments

Modern day computers are really the sum of their parts.  As a result, sometimes deciding which component to upgrade first requires some deeper questions to be answered to make the right decision.  These questions really revolve around how you use your computer. The BIG question: Upgrade the Processor or RAM?

The BIG question: Upgrade the Processor or RAM?

Let’s consider this scenario. You run several programs at once and notice slowdowns in using programs or when switching between applications.  There’s a very good chance you are running low on RAM memory.  Of course your best tool to confirm this would be the task manager built into windows.  Windows 10 has enhanced this tool greatly to show you how much memory is in use by every application.  When Windows runs low on RAM memory it “swaps” information to storage to keep memory available for your programs.  Hard disks are immensely slower than RAM and hence performance takes a hit.  Modern day Solid State drives are much faster and so that swapping is less of a performance issue, but still noticeable if it happens.

In the next scenario, you are using processor intensive applications like CAD, video rendering, video conversion, and you notice it takes a long time to complete or the system feels very sluggish and non-responsive.  By now, you’ve checked the task manager and noticed you still have plenty of RAM available.

Another clue could by the number of “cores” in your current processor.  Core i3 processors for example typically only have 2 physical processing cores.  Core i5 processors typically have 4 cores.  The more cores you have, the more operations the computer can perform at the same time.  Also some programs will use multiple cores to get tasks done faster.  This is why more cores can “sometimes” mean better performance as well.

In conclusion we come back to the first point, your computer’s performance really is the sum of its parts.  You can have an incredibly fast processor but if your system is starved of RAM you will see performance issues.  So, take some time and do a little detective work to see what exactly is the bottleneck on your computer.  Want to know more about topics like this?  Feel free to contact us.

By PC Geeks Support / Blog / / 0 Comments

You don’t have to send your laptop to an expensive repair shop if a part breaks. If you have the proper tools and knowledge, you can do many of your own repairs or upgrades to your laptop, saving both time and money. Before you grab a screwdriver and start taking your computer apart, learn about some practices to follow. After all, there is a reason IT repair technicians need to have professional certifications.

Replacing Laptop Parts: Best Practices for DIY Repair

Ground Yourself

If you’ve ever walked across a carpet and touched a metal doorknob, you know what static electricity can do. That relatively small shock you get can travel into the computer when you take it apart, and the internal components have much more sensitivity. If you aren’t careful, your repair attempt could destroy critical parts. Before you touch anything inside the laptop, put your hand briefly on a metal object to dissipate any built-up static. When you handle any peripheral cards, hold them by the edges; the oils on your skin can damage circuits. An anti-static wrist bracelet can keep you grounded while you work. Always unplug the laptop from AC power and remove its battery.

Document Everything

Depending on what repairs you do, you’ll have to remove screws and components to get to what you’re trying to fix. Laptops are more compact than desktops and lack the space, so you have to be extra careful. Remember where each screw goes, in what order you disassembled the computer, and take pictures if necessary. Keep different sizes of screws separate and label them.

Use Minimal Force

If a part doesn’t easily and immediately click into place, do not try to force it. This is another reason why you need to label and document everything; it can be easy to place the wrong card back into a slot. Look for retaining clips beside the card slot before attempting to remove a card. If these clips break, the card may not stay where it needs to be. Putting too much pressure on a card can bend or break the electrical contacts.

Seek Professional Advice

Although it is possible to deal with laptop repairs on your own, some may require special tools that you don’t have. If you need to get an in-depth repair or simply have questions, don’t hesitate to contact us.

By PC Geeks Support / Blog / / 0 Comments

Are you still using an older version of Windows, like 7 or even XP? If so, have you considered upgrading to Windows 10? While the window for free upgrades to Windows 10 for owners of Windows 7 and 8 has ended, there are a number of advantages that Windows 10 have over previous versions of Windows that make it well worth the cost of a license.

Still Not Using Windows 10? Here's Why You Should Be

Reason #1 – More User Friendly (The Start Menu is Back!)

Windows 8’s removal of the ubiquitous Start Menu from other versions of Windows was disliked by many consumers, leaving a number of people to feel alienated. Many people preferred the older style start menu and felt that Windows 8 was too focused on bridging the gap between traditional keyboard-and-mouse-driven computers and touch-screen-based devices, and some even went so far as to install custom start menus! However, if you use Windows 10, you do not have to go through any of the hassle of implementing third party solutions. The Windows 10 start menu is compact, concise, and offers a clean and distinctly modern update of the old start menu. Overall, Windows 10 is the fastest, most efficient, and user-friendly version of Windows ever created, surpassing both Windows 7 and Windows 8 in delivering a much improved, more enjoyable overall user experience across a wide range of hardware platforms and processor types.

Reason #2 – It’s Faster

Windows 10 features “Fast Startup,” itself an upgraded version of “Fast Boot” from Windows 10. This works similarly to the “hibernate” shutdown option from older versions of Windows and works by storing currently running programs and data in your system RAM into a temporary file on your hard disk, which is loaded on your next system startup. This allows you to easily pick up where you left off when you last shut down your computer. This results in the computer booting up significantly faster, especially when coupled with an SSD or solid state disk drive. In general, Windows 10 is more efficient and faster, and Fast Startup is one of many ways in which this is true.

Reason #3 – DirectX 12 Support

If you intend on playing modern video games with your computer, Windows 10 is an absolute must for two main reasons: newer and better hardware drivers and DirectX 12. DirectX 12 is the latest version of the Microsoft DirectX API, and features vastly improved performance over DirectX 11. It is significantly more efficient, which gives game developers a lot more freedom in making complex and detailed games at higher frame rates than would be possible with DirectX 11. Not to mention it also has full-fledged support for DirectX Raytracting, which is a ground-breaking new graphics technology allowing for hyper-realistic lighting effects and reflections unlike anything previously possible.

Reason #4 – Support and Updates

Windows 10 will be supported for years to come, in terms of both security updates and mainstream updates. On the other hand, mainstream support for both Windows 7 and 8 has already ended, and extended support for both will end in 2020 and 2023 respectively. This could leave your system more vulnerable later down the road if you do not upgrade.

Reason #5 – Microsoft Edge

Microsoft Edge, Microsoft’s preferred, built-in web browser for Windows 10, is a huge improvement over Internet Explorer. Much like Windows 10 itself, it is sleeker, faster, more stable, and more secure its predecessor. In addition to being the most secure browser available for Windows, studies have shown Edge to be significantly more efficient in terms of memory and battery usage than alternate browsers such as Google Chrome. This can be a critical factor in choosing browsers for mobile devices such as laptops.

Final Notes

Not only is Windows 10 is a massive improvement from previous versions of Windows, it is an absolute must-have if you are building a new Windows PC. New licenses of Windows 7 and 8 are no longer offered for sale by Microsoft or from authorized Microsoft resellers.

This means than any new computer you buy now will come with Windows come pre-installed with Windows 10 in one of two versions, Home or Professional. Most consumer-grade PCs are preloaded with the Home edition.

For comparison of the two versions, consult this chart from Microsoft.

And if you have an older Windows computer, it is imperative to upgrade now to Windows 10, not only to take advantage of the many improvements Windows 10 offers over its predecessors, but to guarantee that you have the stability and security of many more years of trouble-free computing.

Do you need help with your computer, like selecting the best version of Windows 10 for your needs and installing or upgrading it? Feel free to contact us at one of our locations, and we will provide professional assistance and help you avoid the hassle!

By PC Geeks Support / Blog / / 0 Comments

Your device’s touchscreen is one of the most fragile parts in your technology. Whether it’s a smartphone, a tablet, or even a dual laptop, the screen is designed to be hypersensitive and that can be bad news. If your screen looks frozen to the touch, don’t take it into a repair shop or force a restart just yet.

How to Troubleshoot an Unresponsive Touchscreen

Instead, try these simple ways to fix the screen or narrow down the likely problems.

1. Check the screen itself.

Dust usually isn’t enough to make a device not register your finger. But if there’s enough debris clinging to the screen, you’ll get only sporadic control over the device. Wipe down the surface without adding moisture and try again. If there are any chances your device has been near water, especially if it’s a phone, take off the protective screen and try again. Even a thin film of water between the screen and the plastic is enough to stop it from responding.

2. Plug in a mouse and go through your settings.

If your device doesn’t allow for anything but touch, this might be the point where you have no choice but a hard restart. With tablets and laptops, plug in a mouse and go through your options manually first. Start by going through the settings. Re-calibrate the touchscreen if possible, and change the sensitivity setting to its highest level.

Also, make sure the mouse or keyboard insert is connecting properly. If your USB is registering only a partial or intermittent connection, that can disrupt your touchscreen. This also helps you know if the problem is a hardware or software issue.

Another way to get to the bottom of things is to put your device in safe mode, especially if you have recently updated the operating system. Software glitches happen, and they can manifest in ways that make it hard to find the root problem.

If you have other screen problems besides it being frozen to the touch, go to PC Geeks for more tips.

By PC Geeks Support / Blog / / 0 Comments

Batteries are getting better. Laptops can live for longer and handle more activity without draining the life out of them. But batteries aren’t perfect yet. Even if you have a great battery life per charge, there’s only so many full charges per battery before those cycles stop being so impressive. One of the best ways to keep your whole laptop in good condition is to protect the battery. So keep these three things at bay:

3 Things That Can Hurt Your Laptop Battery

1. A low battery charge

Don’t let your battery drop below 20% of a charge.

The easiest way to do this is to take advantage of many computers’ default battery-saving mode that dims the screen and recommends you shut down a few programs. Each time your battery gets too close to 0%, you risk diminishing the capacity the battery (if you have an older laptop) or slowly lowering the estimated of full charging cycles your hardware has in it.

Always have a backup power cord with you. Even better, get a backup battery pack that charges both your laptop and your phone. There’s no guarantee that you’ll be near a power outlet when you get the warning.

2. High temperatures

Heat is hard on every part of your computer, and the battery is no exception. Even though your laptop is called a laptop, keep it on a flat surface that doesn’t block the vents. Also try to avoid leaving it in your car during the summer.

3. Passive but high-activity programs

Computers have so much more capacity than they used to that it’s easy to have them do too much at once. But if you have a lot of programs running in the background, they’re going to eat through your battery power. Some sneaky programs don’t even turn off when you fold down your screen. Just like you have to clean every new computer off bloatware, uninstall everything that’s costing you too much battery life.

Go to PC Geeks for more ways to make every part of your computer last longer.